Thursday, 30 October 2014

Trip to Glorious Ellora – Ajanta and Aurangabad

After a beautiful Costal trip to Ratnagiri and nearby area, we decided to visit the Ajanta and Ellora Caves. These 2 sites were in my travel wish list from a long time. Considering Diwali holidays, we planned a 4 day trip to Ellora – Ajanta and Aurangabad.

Travelers for this trip were Me, Renuka and my parents-in-law.

Ajanta Caves, Wonder of India
Ajanta Caves, Wonder of India

About Ellora – Ajanta caves and Aurangabad:
                Aurangabad is the 5th largest city in Maharashtra state. It is named after the Mughal Emperor Aurangzeb. It is also famous as a tourism hub as many historical monuments are close to the city. It includes UNESCO World Heritage Sites such as Ellora – Ajanta caves, Bibi Ka Maqbara, Jayakwadi Dam and many more places.
              Ellora and Ajanta Caves are located 30km and 110km away respectively from Aurangabad. Ellora consists of 34 "caves" that are actually structures excavated out of the vertical face of the Charanandri hills. Buddhist, Hindu and Jain rock-cut temples and viharas and mathas were built between the 5th century and 10th century. Ajanta consists of 30 rock-cut Buddhist cave monuments which date from the 2nd century BCE to about 480 or 650 CE. Carvings and paintings inside the caves are the masterpieces and clearly indicate why these are UNESCO World Heritage Sites. The Ajanta caves are cut into the side of a cliff that is on the south side of a U-shaped gorge on the small river Waghur. 

The route to reach Aurangabad from Pune is –
Pune – Take road behind Pune station - Yerawada Bridge – Take right after crossing bridge for Nagar Road – Drive on highway No 27 – Ahmednagar – Aurangabad.
The route to reach Ellora caves from Aurangabad is – 
Aurangabad – Aurangabad cantonment area – Daulatabad (Visit daulatabad fort) – Khuldabad – Do not take a right for kuldabad - Ellora caves
The route to reach Ajanta caves from Aurangabad is – 
Aurangabad – join State highway 8 – Phulambri – Sillod – Ajanta Caves

Our stay was at our (Me and Renuka) best friend Ashu’s house which is in a small village called Manjari. Even though village was small, their house was of Wada type with huge acres of farm land behind the Wada. Manjari village is hardly 35km away from Aurangabad city.

Day 0: 25th Oct 2014 – Pune - Manjari village (Total Distance traveled: 214 km):
               It was the last day of the Diwali festival i.e. Bhaubeej. After celebrating this day with relatives, we left Pune by 4 PM. Our target was to reach at Manjari by 8.30 PM and take rest. Ashu’s uncle who is also fond of travelling joined us for next 4 days.
               The drive till Ranjangaon was a bit difficult due to heavy traffic. After crossing Ranjangaon, it was a smooth drive till Manjari. Due to some cyclone on west costal area the weather was cloudy and rain accompanied us till Aurangabad which made us our journey more pleasant. We took a pit stop at town called Supe for snacks and reached Manjari by 9 PM. 

Stay at Manjari Village

Expenses:
  • Car Petrol: INR 3000/- (approx. 40 lit at 76/Lit)
  • Toll 1: INR 45/- (single journey)
  • Toll 2 (at Nagar): INR 30/- (single journey)
  • Toll 3 (at Khadka): INR 30/- (single journey)
  • Snacks at supe: INR 90/- (Vada Pav and tea)

Day 1: 26th Oct 2014 – Manjari – Daulatabad – Ellora - Grishneshwar (Total Distance: 300 km):
           We woke up a bit late by 7 AM, spent some time with friend’s relatives. After breakfast we left for a day trip by 9.30 AM. It was a lazy start for our trip. Our first destination was Daulatabad Fort. After 45-50 km drive we reached at the parking area of the Fort. Daulatabad fort is a 12th century structure situated about 15 kilometers from the city of Aurangabad.
            It was built in the 12th century by the Yadava King of Bhillima V and was called Devgiri. Devagiri was also known as “Devgad”, “Surgiri” and “Dhargiri”. Then, it was acquired by Alauddin Khilji who made it a Mughal stronghold. In the early 14th century, Sultan Mohammed-bin-Tughlak, moved his capital from Delhi to Devgiri and renamed this fort city as Daulatabad. Fort consists of multiple layers of massive walls, deep water trench around fort, and complex arrangement of entryways for strong defense.

Information Board

             After crossing the entrance gate, you can see strong walls with guard rooms and different types of cannons kept for display. The arrangement of the entrance is in such a way that any enemy entering the gates is subject to attack from all sides. The walls surrounding the main entrance gate are still in good shape. After crossing the entrance structures, we took a walk towards the main fort area. On left side of walkway, you can see huge water tank known as Hatti Talav (meaning, Elephant Lake). This artificial lake is 38 meter long, 38 meter wide and 66 meter deep. Due to the hugeness, it is known as Hatti Talav. This might have been the main source of water for the entire fort.
             There is a very beautiful temple at the back side of Lake, known as “Bharatmata” temple. It is dedicated to mother India. The courtyard of the temple doesn’t have a typical roof but consists of many beautiful sculptures. This temple looks like it is from ancient time of ‘Yadavas’. There is a big statue of “Bharatmata” inside the temple. Pillars inside temple are carved in such a way that they are in same line and of same size. The beauty of the temple can be seen only after entering the temple premises. 

Bharatmata Temple, Daulatabad Fort
Bharatmata Temple, Daulatabad Fort

           On the right side of walkway, there is four stage 100 meter height tower known as Chand minar. It is said that, Sultan Ahmed Shah constructed this tower to commemorate the victory over Gujarat. It is prohibited to enter inside this tower. After crossing Minar, you come across first gate with strong bastions at both the sides. Climb on fort starts from this point. Nice stone steps are laid till the top most point of the fort. You can see second gate known as Dindi Darwaja, Chini mahal which was used for keeping prisoners on the fort and a cannon called as “Mendha Tof”. 

Chand Minar
Chand Minar

              Next attraction on fort is the Moat (deep, wide ditch surrounding a castle to defend against attack) around fort. There are 2 bridges on the Moat for crossing. One is an Iron Bridge (Later constructed) and another old one made up of stone at lower level. The trench was made in such a way, that if the enemy enters the main wall, the moat was filled with water enough to drown the rock bridge. The trail after crossing the bridge takes us to the third entrance which can hold a maximum of 10 to 12 people. After this, you can see the entrance in a cave known as Dark maze. A narrow path in the maze is created in such a way that the enemy can get confused and finds it difficult to move ahead. There are small windows on the roof which were used to release smoke of hot chilies and oil into the tunnel by keeping a hot pan at the top of the tunnel. There is no light source in the tunnel whereas second part has some light connections. After crossing the tunnel way and few steps, you can reach at the top. At the top, an extensive octagonal building called as ‘Bardari’ can be seen. The balconies of the palace offer you a view of fort and Daulatabad town. The right side door inside the palace takes you to the top-most point of the fort. 

Moat of Fort

Dark Maze
Dark Maze, first half of maze w/o light on left whereas second part on right with light source

Palace on top
Palace on Top

               After crossing Bijali Darwaja, a big bastion can be seen. This bastion has a cave within it. It consists of a water tank and footprints of “Janardan Swami”. At the top most point, there is a 20 ft. long cannon named as “Durga” or “Dhuldhaan”. It was very difficult to conquer such invincible, inaccessible and strong fort.

Durga or Dhuldhaan Cannon
Durga or Dhuldhaan Cannon

             After visiting such a massive fort, our next destination was Ellora Caves. We had lunch at a roadside dhaba and reached at Ellora caves. The Ellora Caves are located about 28 km from the city. The actual name of Ellora cave is Verul but it was difficult to pronounce for the British and thus was renamed as Ellora. Main attraction in Ellora cave is Kailashnatha Temple. The Kailashnatha Temple is cave number 16 amongst the 34 caves of Ellora. Building the Kailasa temple self consumed around 200 years to complete. Apart for the grand Kailashnatha Temple, there are 33 rock-cut caves in all at Ellora; some breathtaking and some that could be bypassed. Of the 34, 12 are Buddhist caves, 17 Hindu and 5 Jain caves. It is recommend that you must visit cave numbers – 10, 11, 12, 15, 29, 31, 32 and 33. The Buddhist caves are rich in paintings and iconography. Cave 10 represents a Buddhist Chaityagriha (prayer hall). 



Information board

The Kailashnatha Temple
The Kailashnatha Temple

              Due to lack of time, we saw cave number 16, 15, 18 and 29. This temple is remarkable example of Dravidian architecture on account of its striking proportion; elaborate workmanship, architectural content, and sculptural ornamentation of rock-cut architecture. The Kailasa Temple is notable for its vertical excavation—carving started at the top of the original rock and excavated downward. After entering in Kailasa Temple, we took left side path to see entire temple. There are 2 pillars (Dhwajasthambha) in the courtyard. Also on the wall of the temple you can see the story of epic Mahabharata carved beautifully. Surrounding walls have beautiful carvings which are at more than one level. A two-storied gateway opens to reveal a U-shaped courtyard. Carving, sculpted panels on walls tell you stories related to Ramayana, mahabharat, Lord Vishu and Lord Shankar. Temple premises consists of two structures; one is Shiva temple and second is Nandi Mandapa. A rock bridge connects the Nandi Mandapa to the porch of the temple. It takes around 2 hours to see entire temple in detail. 

War story of epic Mahabharata
War story of epic Mahabharata

Dhawjasthambha, Temple and Nandi Mandapa

            After the temple visit, everyone took rest when I hiked on the mountain to capture an aerial view of Kailasanatha temple. View of entire temple and garden in front of caves is breathtaking. Other important caves in Ellora are Cave number 1, 2, 10 (Vishwakarma cave), 11 and 12. In Buddha caves, you can see rest rooms, Vihar, chaitya (prayer hall) and Stupas (place of meditation). 

Temple view from hill
Temple view from hill

Sculpted panels on wall - stories related to Ramayana, mahabharat, Lord Vishu and Lord Shankar
Few Sculpted on wall - stories related to Ramayana, mahabharat, Lord Vishu and Lord Shankar

             After visiting the magnificent Ellora caves, we went for Grishneshwar. This temple is small is size but always crowded. It is the 12th Jyotirling temple dedicated to Lord Shiva. It is close to Ellora caves. The temple is built in Red Rock. You cannot carry leather material, camera and mobile inside the temple. Photography is not allowed. We quickly took Darshan and left for our last destination. Our last destination for the day was Badra Maruti temple located in Kulatabad. It is of sleeping Lord Maruti. Temple is clean but surrounding area is not at all maintained. Again Photography is not allowed in the temple.
               By 7 PM we started out return journey and came to Manjari village by 8.30 PM. We celebrated Diwali with small kids from village by lighting sky lanterns.

Expenses:
  • Toll near Aurangabad: INR 45/- (return journey)
  • Daulatabad fort entry: INR 5/- per person
  • Daulatabad fort video camera chargers: INR 25/- (No fees for Camera)
  • Car parking at Verul (Ellora Caves): INR 10/-
  • Ellora Caves entry fee: INR 5/- per person
  • Ellora Caves video camera chargers: INR 25/- (No fees for Camera)
  • Car parking at Kulateshwar Temple: INR 10/-

Day 2: 27th Oct 2014 – Manjari – Jayakwadi Dam – Aurangabad (Total Distance traveled: 290 km):
               Our today’s target was to visit Jayakwadi Dam for bird watching and then some tourist spots from Aurangabad city. We woke up by 5.30 AM and left the village by 6.15 AM. After an hour drive, we reached near the Dam area. Road condition was quite poor whereas roads nearby Dam area were in terrible conditions.

Jayakwadi Dam

              Unfortunately, we were not able to spot any birds on the water body. Either migration season had not yet started or we were at wrong side of Dam. While driving towards Paithan if you keep a watch on right side there is a Bird sanctuary board (near Dalwadi village). Take right and drive towards wall. A watch tower is constructed to spot birds from the water bank. We saw few birds and then drove towards open jail area. We were able to see few local migratory birds such as Open bill Asian stork, white Ibis, black ibis, glossy ibis, grey heron etc.

Open bill Asian stork and Ibis

               By 10 AM we went to our next destination Paithan. We saw Sant eknath temple where he took Samadhi. After our quick visit to Paithan town we left for Aurangabad sightseen. We had tasty lunch at hotel Abhiruchi on Paithan - Aurangabad road. 

Sant Eknath Temple
Sant Eknath Temple

            In Aurangabad, our first destination was Panchakki (Water mill). This mill was designed to generate energy via water brought down from a spring on a mountain. It was built in 1744 to commemorate Hazrat Baba Shah Musafir, a religious teacher who had emigrated all the way from the Russian town of Gazdavan. It was used to grind the grain for the pilgrims. A large size water tank is not maintained properly and it has many fishes. There is nothing much to see as tourist other than old Panchakki. 

Panchakki

               Our next and last destination for the day was Bibi ka Maqbara. It is a most recognized monument of Aurangabad city. The Bibi Ka Maqbara was built by Azam Shah, the oldest son of Aurangzeb. This was his attempt to rival the Taj Mahal built by his grandfather, albeit in memory of his mother, Rabia Durrani, the first wife of Aurangzeb. One of the striking features of Bibi Ka Maqbara is it’s resemblance with the Taj Mahal in Agra in terms of design. It is often called the Deccan Taj or the Taj of the Deccan. 

Taj Mahal, Agra
Taj Mahal, Agra (Photo taken in year 2009)

Bibi ka Maqbara
Bibi ka Maqbara

             People who have seen Taj mahal may find this place quite average. I have seen Taj Mahal and Bibi ka Maqbara is just a poor replica of Taj. But still the structure is very beautiful and white marble is used for construction. Bibi ka Maqbara follows the charbagh (literally meaning four gardens) layout which was a common element in Mughal architecture. 

Way towards Bibi ka Maqbara
Way towards Bibi ka Maqbara

              Construction of the Taj Mahal was completed in 1653, while the Bibi Ka Maqbara was built sometime between 1651 and 1661. It is said that while the Taj Mahal was built at a cost of approximately 32 million rupees, the amount allocated to Azam Shah for the Bibi Ka Maqbara was a paltry 7 lakhs. Azam Shah’s only claim to fame is the Bibi Ka Maqbara. He was the son of Aurangzeb, but he was Emperor of India for a very short time – a period less than three months! He declared himself emperor after the death of his father, but within three months, he was defeated and executed by his brother, Shah Alam.
             We heard from many tourist not to hire any guide as they charge you between INR 50-100/- and tell you the above story in just 3-4 minute. After Bibi ka maqbara, we spent some time in the city to see market places and different gates. Aurangabad is titled as "The City of Gates" and the strong presence of these can be felt as one drives through the city. By evening time we came back to Manjari village and spend remaining time with our friend and her family.

Expenses:
  • Toll near Aurangabad: INR 45/- (return journey)
  • Toll near Paithan: INR 40/- (return journey)
  • Lunch at Abhiruchi hotel: INR 638/- for 5 people (Papad, Panjabi veg, roti and rice)
  • Entry at Panchakki: INR 5/- per person
  • Car parking at bibi ka Maqbara: INR 10/-
  • Entry at Bibi ka Maqbara: INR 5/- per person
  • Bibi ka Maqbara video camera chargers: INR 25/- (No fees for Camera)

Day 3: 28th Oct 2014 – Manjari –Ajanta Caves – Manjari (Total Distance traveled: 350 km):
              We woke up by 6 AM and left Manjari village by 7.30 AM for Ajanta caves. Distance of Ajanta from our location was around 170-175km. Without any pit stop, we headed towards Ajanta caves. Road condition was average. We took lunch break by 11.30 AM at a dhaba which was view point junction of Ajanta caves. We reached at Caves parking area by 12.30 PM. From this point, you need to board on MTDC’s buses that take you to the base point of Ajanta caves. Distance is around 4 km and road goes through very dense forest with some curvy roads around hill region. No prior booking is required for MTDC’s bus service and Caves are closed on every Monday.
              We got the bus quickly and reach at Cave’s base point. After purchasing entry tickets, I was in hurry to see the magnificent wonder named Ajanta caves. From this point, you need to climb steps to gain a height. After certain height gain, I saw beautiful Ajanta caves, excavated in a horse-shoe shaped rock surface about 77 meters in height overseeing a narrow stream known as Waghora. Entire cave sight was simply incredible and I was happy to see what I had come so far to see.

Ajanta Caves
Ajanta Caves, Entry towards first Cave

               It is a phenomenal place as Caves are built over 2000 years ago, in second century BC. Most recent caves were dug out of rock in the 9th century AD. History says that, this mountain region was ancient Deccan trade route to the sea and these caves were house of the Buddhist monks as well as a place for traders/pilgrims to take a rest during monsoon time. I can almost imagine them walking barefoot through the dense forests, unaware of the dangers, seeking a place on such a cliff where they could find peace. These people were great explorers and must be great artists, excavating, carving and painting the caves as beautifully as they did. 

Painting on Ajanta Cave's roof
Painting on Cave's roof

Carving and painting at Ajanta Caves
Carving and painting at Ajanta Caves

              British officer John Smith on a hunting mission accidentally rediscovered these caves in 1819. There are 29 to 30 Caves and few of which are unfinished. The caves are numbered 1 to 29 according to their place along the path. The caves were dug over two periods – the first set around the 2nd century BC, during the reign of the Satavahanas. The earliest group of caves consists of caves 9, 10, 12, 13 and 15A. In these caves, we can see Stupas representing the Buddha, but not figures. The paintings represent stories, especially from the Jataka Tales. The second sets of caves were excavated somewhere between 6th to 7th centuries AD, during the reign of the Vakataka kings. Second phase Caves are more focused on buddha’s life which is now known to world. It also consists of Vihar, chaitya (prayer hall) and Stupas (place of meditation). Paintings in caves were very old but still masterpiece art. Even after so many years the colors still look fresh and each painting conveys a story to you. 

Gautam Buddha
Gautam Buddha

            Once you enter the Ajanta caves area, Cave number one is on your right side and all others are sequenced accordingly. The paintings seen in the interiors and exteriors of the caves include different images. These images are Great Buddha, a Goddess on the upper left corner of the shrine doorway, a Bodhisattva believed to be Padmapani Avaokitesvara, Four Deer with a Common Head, Lovers, a Dark Princess believed to be an Andhra Princess, a Dancing Girl with Musicians, a Princess Reclining by a Pillar, a Maid seated on the Ground, Proceedings in a Persian Court, the Golden Geese, the Pink Elephant, a Bull Fight, etc. 
            Cave 6 is believed to be the first important cave of the Mahayana phase. It comprises of a central pillar in the lower story, along with an image of seated Lord Buddha. Cave no 7 consist of beautiful painted ceiling and simple carving. Cave number 9 and 10 are Chaitya Gathering Hall. One of the most impressive images seen inside cave number 18 is that of a princess looking at her mirror, with a child looking at her from below. You can see rest cells inside caves meant for rest. 

Stupa

            Do not miss Cave number 26 of Sleeping Buddha. This Cave was chaitya hall with Stupas in it. Painting of small Princess on pillars has its own specialty. If you look at the painting from any direction still it gives you a feel that same princess is staring at you. Spending 4 hours in Ajanta world, we started with our return journey. After crossing bridge on river, we saw a waterfall which was at the end of horse-shoe shaped mountain. 

Sleeping Buddha at cave no 26
Sleeping Buddha at cave no 26

Princess painting on pillar (Staring at you from any direction)
Princess painting on pillar (Staring at you from any direction)

Same Princess painting on pillar from other direction (Staring at you)

Ajanta Caves
Ajanta Caves

            I wanted to see entire Ajanta caves from a height. There is a view point location which is just opposite to caves. To reach at this point, you need to climb few steps. I alone went there as others were tired. From this point, you can see entire Caves in 120 degree view. I wondered what happened in past that made the monks disappear from Ajanta. Some caves have been left unfinished. Answer to this question was unknown. The only thing we do know is that Ajanta was abandoned and the caves were hidden by nature till the British officer found his way there. After capturing this moment, I came down to catch the bus. This place is simply fabulous and everyone should visit this once.

Waterfall on Waghora River

Ajanta Caves from view point
Ajanta Caves from view point



We started our return journey and took dinner in Ludhiana hotel on Aurangabad – Nagar highway. It was a perfect day of our vacation. 

Expenses:
  • Toll on Ajanta route: INR 40/- return journey
  • Car Petrol: INR 2000/- (approx. 27 lit at 73/lit)
  • Lunch at dhaba: INR 750/- for 5 person
  • Ajanta Car parking: INR 30/-
  • Ajanta person tax: INR 10/- per person
  • Bus service till Ajanta Caves: INR 15/- per person
  • Ajanta Caves entry: INR 10/- per person
  • Ajanta Caves light chargers: INR 5/- (for group of 20 people)
  • Ajanta Caves video camera chargers: INR 25/- (No fees for Camera)
  • Bus service to Ajanta parking: INR 15/- per person
  • Dinner at hotel Ludhiyana on Aurangabad-Manajari highway: INR 520/- for 5 people

Day 4: 29th Oct 2014 – Manjari –Pune (Total Distance traveled: 220 km):
             Today was our last day of vacation. Our stay was at friends place in small village and they own more than 100 acre of farming land behind their house. Also they were having additional huge acre of farming land which was just 5 km away from village. We were aware of one fact that many group of deer’s and blackbucks can be spotted easily in the farms. It was best opportunity for me to capture them in my camera. It was in my mind from day one.
              Without any kind of alarm, I woke up by 6 AM and was set for photography. Ashu’s brother and uncle were ready with 2-3 bikes as after certain point it wasn’t possible to go ahead by car. After few minute’s drive, we reached in a farm. With the help of binocular we spotted a group of deer and blackbucks. I went in the farming area and clicked few shots. That group was small hence I was not satisfied. Prashant kasale (my friend’s young enthuse uncle) asked me to join him for more blackbuck sighting. We both went 2-3 km in different direction and saw 30-40 blackbuck. Wow, it was great moment for me to click them. Without disturbing them I manage to click few shots. These animals are problem for farmers as they destroy farms during their internal fight. Group of farmers from other side came towards blackbucks and the beautiful animals ran away.

Blackbucks
Look at Me...Black bucks 

Blackbuck in action
Blackbuck in action

            While returning to village, we saw group of 50 blackbucks running from one end to another. I realized that if doesn’t move ahead then they will cross the road just few ft. away from us. We parked bike near bushes and sat down on road. Within few minute they crossed the road. To capture them while jumping was different experience for me.

Let's Run...Blackbucks

Blackbucks
Stop...Blackbucks are crossing the route

Long Jump or high jump...Blackbucks crossing road
Long Jump or high jump...Blackbucks crossing road

            We came back in the village and spend some time with the relatives. After breakfast we left for Pune journey. On the way to Pune, we took small break at Devgad village which has a nice temple of Lord Datta. The temple premise is large and very clean. We left Devgad after lunch in nearby hotel. We travelled via Nagar – Highway No 27 and reached Pune safely by 7.00 PM.

Expenses:
Water bottles: INR 15/- per bottle
Lunch at Devgad: INR 125/- for 5 people (Pithle Bhakri)
Toll 1 (at Khadka): INR 30/- (single journey)
Toll 2 (at Nagar): INR 30/- (single journey)
Toll 3: INR 45/- (single journey)

Visit Places which we miss due to lack of Time:
  • Aurangabad Caves
  • Soneri Palace
  • Gavatala Wildlife Sanctuary
Thanks for reading this Travel Blog.
Happy traveling.

Pritesh Kulkarni 
Pune

21 comments:

  1. refreshing Blog. as always.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Hi pritesh ..no words to describe .....the photos...specially the photos of the bucks were just like celebrating nature ...and ashu's house ..wow...pritesh ...please do write a blog on the ancient buildings of our very own Pune ..near shaniwarwada ..camp area.....you should capture the beauty and architecture of these buildings ...before they are demolished by people who dont find the significant beauty of those buildings....some buildings near to shaniwarwada are already under demolition ..i hope you will consider this ...suggestion in your next blog .....

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you Yamini,

      Will sure consider this suggestion and will try to cover Pune city in year 2015.

      Pritesh
      Happy traveling...!!!

      Delete
  3. Again a great blog presented by u with detailed history and great pictures, I had read some blogs in Web but no one can't give up like you, hands off you Priteshji

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you very much for reading my blog

      Pritesh
      Happy traveling...!!!

      Delete
  4. Awesome blog with detailed information as always!!!! :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you very much for reading my blog

      Pritesh
      Happy traveling...!!!

      Delete
  5. Really this is a very nice and attractive post. Thanks to share with us.

    ReplyDelete
  6. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks for your comment... Please avoid ads/website link in the comment... such post will be deleted

      Regards,
      Pritesh

      Delete
  7. Fantastic writing, enjoyed it thoroughly! Thanks for sharing! May I know how did you manage low light photography inside the caves. Did you use tripod? I love photography and planning to go there so... :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks for comment... I used mini tripod inside caves. also Tripod is not allowed in caves so you need to take a permission from office before you start caves trip. In few caves I was not allowed to use tripod.
      Regards,

      Pritesh kulkarni
      Happy travelling

      Delete
  8. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks for your comment... Please avoid ads/website link in the comment... such post will be deleted

      Regards,
      Pritesh

      Delete
  9. Awesome blog pritesh ji..

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks for your comment. Happy travelling

      Pritesh Kulkarni

      Delete
  10. Thanks for all the relevant history in brief...and thanks for all the tips about the dos and donts...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks for your comment. Happy travelling

      Pritesh Kulkarni

      Delete
  11. THANK YOU SO MUCH FOR SHARE ALL THE PLACE WITH PHOTOS. IT IS A VERY INFORMATIVE BLOG .

    ReplyDelete
  12. nice blog.
    can you tell me when is the best time to visit this place, also if small children are along is it a good option.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi,
      Post monsoon n winter time is the best time to visit along with childrens
      Pritesh Kulkarni

      Delete